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Thursday, August 21, 2014

The Peacekeeper Vision

Communities of people who look out for each other. Neighbors and friends who help each other out when someone has an emergency, be it a robbery or just a bad fall.  Individuals who stand up for themselves and those they care about, rather than relying on a bureaucratic system to save them.
This is the vision of Peacekeeper. It’s an app, but it’s more than that. At its heart, Peacekeeper is about independence and personal empowerment.
The problem right now is that people are increasingly isolated from each other and reliant on system that either doesn’t serve them well or outright fails. There’s nothing wrong with calling 911, but relying exclusively on them is a mistake when the average emergency is over well before the centralized and bureaucratic system can send someone to help. More than that, though, relying on this sort of bureaucracy for salvation robs us of our independence.
It’s our opinion people are mostly benevolent: deep down, we have a gut instinct to care for those we’re close to. Suppressing that instinct in favor of one single solution without options doesn’t really speak to our nature or our humanity.
Peacekeeper aims to fix that.
Our vision is of tight-knit communities that look out for each other, and that embody three key values: protection, independence, and benevolence. We like to consider these our objectives as a company, and we hope the community chooses to adopt them as well.
Maximum Protection
Most bureaucratic protection services are too slow to prevent crimes. One policeman said he was frustrated because he felt like a glorified janitor: he arrived in time to clean up the mess, but not to stop it. That’s irritating for policemen who signed up to save lives. It’s also potentially deadly for ordinary citizens who were under the impression it is the role of the officer to “protect” them. That’s the idea behind the large taxes we are told we must pay to have these necessary services.
But wouldn’t it be better if you could stop a crime while it’s happening or be there to potentially save the life of a loved one?
That’s the goal of Peacekeeper. You can create your very own “Tribe” of friends, family, and neighbors. When one person in your Tribe is in danger or needs help, they can let everyone else know instantly. No being put on hold by overworked 911 dispatchers. No wondering what ‘priority’ your emergency is for state officials miles away. You let your Tribe know you need help, and they can respond immediately. Neighbors can respond in seconds.
Imagine a burglar robbing your house, freezing mid-heist when your neighbor shows up out front with a shotgun. Imagine your elderly friend who falls and breaks her hip, and can call someone from her Tribe to take her to the hospital in minutes instead of waiting for an ambulance. Peacekeeper has the potential to be instantaneous response. It can be as strong and as fast as your network is close in proximity and relation. And because of that, Peacekeeper can save lives.
By putting your safety in your hands and those of your Tribe, Peacekeeper gives you independence from the system you might fundamentally disagree with or one you’ve simply found not to work. You no longer have to be reliant for help on a centrally planned system designed by politicians and bureaucrats. You can be proactive in your neighborhood when it comes to crime prevention, and you can put your faith into people you know and trust – while also providing those you love the most with a solution that can help you in a time that calls for urgent action.
Peacekeeper is predicated on the idea that most people have an innate desire to help the ones they care about. If your friend’s in trouble, you want to know. If your girlfriend’s being robbed, you have a gut desire to go fight for her. Peacekeeper, at its heart, is about giving you the tools to act on that benevolence.
More than that, it’s about creating benevolent communities. Neighborhoods where people across the street watch out for each other instead of living atomistic lives.  Housing and apartment complexes where you feel a bond with those who live near you, cemented by your mutual willingness to take care of each other in an emergency.
Community is a building block of civilization, but too often communities become home to people who might not even talk to each other. That can be changed. A sense of community can be brought back with the press of a button — literally.
Try Peacekeeper today, start or join a greater area Tribe Meetup, and gain the tools to protect yourself and those around you now. It could be the start of a whole new world.
This article first appeared at  

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Jasper Roberts Consulting - Widget